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Municipal Bond Forum

FMSbonds, Inc.'s Bond Forum™ is an exclusive opportunity for investors to submit questions and comments on the bond market or to respond to one of our articles.

To participate, just send us an e-mail. Be sure to include your name or initials and your state of residence. Posted e-mails may be edited for length and clarity. If you prefer a private response, please note that in your e-mail. Responses are provided by James A. Klotz, president and co-founder of FMSbonds, Inc., a municipal bond specialist for more than 35 years; Dr. Jay H. Abrams, chief municipal credit analyst; and other members of the firm as noted.

Postings are listed by date. You may also view postings by topic using the search box below. If you have any questions, please call us at 1-800-FMS-BOND (367-2663) or e-mail us.

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What happens in a restructuring

1/29/2014

I hold Puerto Rico munis with a 15-to 25-year maturity timeline. What exactly happens if Puerto Rico munis were to be restructured? Would a restructure automatically involve all munis issued by the Commonwealth, or could revenue bonds stay outside of a restructure? By revenue bonds, I'm referring to COFINA (sales tax), PRASA and PREPA (utilities) bonds.

 

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James A. Klotz responds

Good questions, but the details of any restructuring would not be determined unless or until such an event occurs.

As we saw in Detroit, the water and sewer system bonds were held to be a dedicated stream of revenue and thus exempted from the bankruptcy settlement.

Looking for yield

1/2/2014

I have a large portfolio of California municipal bonds with an average yield of about 5.20% and eight to nine years in duration. In the current interest rate environment, what maturity dates and quality would you recommend for additional purchases? I would like to obtain yields of close to 5.00%, but I’m concerned about buying long maturity issues if interest rates rise. Also, you talk about “longer-term” bonds. Are you referring to 30-year bonds only or 20 to 30, etc.?

- L.C., California
James A. Klotz responds

Having visited our Web site, you may be aware we are proponents of buying high quality, longer-term bonds, which enables you to maximize tax-free income in your bond portfolio.

This additional income can often exceed the annual income of short-term bonds by more than 60% and enables you to reinvest at higher rates if they do become available.

This philosophy has successfully served municipal bond investors over the years. They recognize that neither they nor market "gurus" have the ability to accurately predict the direction of interest rates for any length of time. In fact, most "experts" have been calling for higher interest rates for years.

Keep in mind that you are buying tax-free bonds for the income. Sometimes over the life of these bonds they will be worth more than you paid for them, and sometimes less. Neither condition should prompt a sale. Bonds are purchased for income, not capital gains.

Today, for a California resident, the return on 5.00% in-state bonds can be comparable to earning 10% on taxable bonds for investors in higher tax brackets.

Regardless of any fluctuations in market value, the dependable stream of tax-free income provided by high quality municipal bonds can be counted on year after year. That's why you are buying bonds in the first place.

As to what we consider to be “longer-term” bonds, it depends on the yield curve at the time of the investment. Whenever we can capture 75% or more of the 30-year rate with a 20-year bond, we would opt for the shorter maturity.

Sitting on cash while the meter runs

12/26/2013

I'm a long-term individual bond investor with a goal of getting a minimum of 5%. California bonds are selling at a very high premium right now. I'm sitting on some cash and wondering what next year might bring in terms of rates and prices.

- E.G., California
James A. Klotz responds

In the 40 years we've been involved in the fixed-income markets, we have yet to see anyone accurately predict the direction of interest rates for any period of time. In fact, the majority of economists and so-called experts have been forecasting higher interest rates every year for the last decade.

The most successful tax-free bond investors commit investable dollars to the market when available, rather than parking these funds in money-market instruments or CDs in an attempt to time the market.

The longer your money is left in these types of accounts, the more money you’ll forgo waiting for interest rates to rise – a phenomenon we refer to as the cost of waiting. If rates do move up, you will need to earn more than 5.00% to achieve your 5.00% goal, and if they don't, you will never catch up.

Bond yields cannot be evaluated in a vacuum; they must be compared with other income options.

In today’s market, no taxable fixed-income bonds (corporates, Treasuries, or agency securities) provide the after-tax return of high quality California bonds.

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This report is produced solely for informational purposes and is not to be construed as a solicitation or an offer to buy or sell any securities or related financial instruments. This report is based on information obtained from sources believed to be reliable but no independent verification has been made, nor is its accuracy or completeness guaranteed.